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Gary W. Kazmer, Associate Professor, Lactation Physiology

Photo of Gary Kazmer

Contact

Phone:

(860) 486-1011

Email:

gary.kazmer@uconn.edu

Office: George White Bldg., Room 112

 

 

 

 


Background

Education

  • Ph.D. (Animal Physiology), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1985
  • M.S. (Dairy Science), Clemson University, 1981
  • B.S. (French), Clemson University, 1977

 

Dr. Kazmer received his Bachelor's degree in French and Master's degree in Dairy Science from Clemson University in Clemson, South Carolina (Hi all y'all Tiger fans!). Then off to the the Blue Ridge mountains, where he received his Ph.D. in Animal Physiology from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (well, that was the name when I was there...now its lovingly called Va-Giiin-Ya-Tek) in Blacksburg, VA. His first academic appointment was at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces, NM. Unfortunately, the stay was rather brief, as the President of that Land-Grant University (I think his name was Hooligan) sold the dairy herd right out from underneath the Animal Science Department! Evidently some people think agriculture and academia don't mix...a sad day. Undaunted by such politics, Dr. Kazmer then took his present position at UConn.


Academics

Area of Interest

I am interested in exploring the grey area between genetics and physiology. Specifically, which genes regulate genetic superiority for milk production traits, what physiological systems mediate this genetic influence and what are the possibilities for controlling these mechanisms to increase efficiency in production. My training has been almost entirely from the physiology end, but I have begun, mainly through my graduate students, to learn about the genomic side of the equation. The explosion of information about the mammalian genome, begun mainly from a medical perspective, has now begun to invade all segments of food production, both plant and animal. Understanding the genome, its influence on phenotype and how it may be manipulated will become in the very near future, IMHO, a major research interest for virtually all animal scientists.

Classes Taught

ANSC 3261/ SAAS 261 Dairy Cattle Management/ Dairy Herd Management
ANSC 3663 Dairy Management & Decision Making
ANSC 3664 Dairy Cattle Evaluation
ANSC 3675 Advanced Animal & Product Evaluation
ANSC 4662W Dairy Herd Management
ANSC 5611 Physiology of Lactation
ANSC 5693 Graduate Presentation Skills
SAAS 262 Applied Dairy Herd Management
SAAS 275 Advanced Animal & Product Evaluation

Presentations

Procopio, M. L., Lopez, A. C., McFadden, K., Kazmer, G., Hoagland, T., Govoni, K., "Expression of T-box3 (Tbx3) in bovine mammary epithelial cells", Joint Annual Meeting (ASAS, ADSA). (July 2011).

 

Publications

Procopio, M. L., Lopez, A. C., McFadden, K. M., Hoagland, T., Kazmer, G., Govoni, K.. Expression of T-box (Tbx) 3 in bovine mammary epithelial cells. 89 (E-Supplement 1), 208. J Anim Sci, Published.

S. Ananda Baskaran, G. W. Kazmer, L. Hinckley, S. M. Andrew, and K. Venkitanarayanan. 2009. Antibacterial effect of plant-derived antimicrobials on major bacterial mastitis pathogens in vitro. J Dairy Sci 92:1423-1429.

W. J. Weber, L. H. Baumgard, G. W. Kazmer, S. A. Zinn, L. B. Hansen, H. Chester-Jones, and B. A. Crooker. 2005. Growth Hormone Response to Growth Hormone Releasing Hormone in Calves that Differ in Genetic Merit for Milk Yield. J. Dairy Sci. 2005 88: 1723-1731.

Baumgard, L.H., W.J. Weber, B.A. Crooker, G.W. Kazmer, S.A. Zinn, L.B. Hansen, and H. Chester-Jones. 2002. Effects of selection for milk yield on growth hormone response to growth hormone releasing factor in growing Holstein calves. J. Dairy Sci. 85: 2569-2540.

Govoni, K.E., X.C. Tian, G.W. Kazmer, M. Taneja, B.P. Enright, A.L. Rivard, X.Z. Yang, and S.A. Zinn. 2002. Age-related changes of the somatotropic axis in cloned Holstein calves. Biol. Repro. 66:1293-8.

Kazmer, G.W., P. Zhou, J.L Troyer, and L.D. Strausbaugh. 2001. Haplotype analysis involving a novel polymorphism in bovine alpha-lactalbumin 5' flanking region. J. Dairy Sci. 84:1542-4.

Kazmer, G.W., S.A. Zinn and L.D. Strausbaugh. 2000. Short communication: growth hormone response to somatostatin-28 and growth hormone-releasing factor in dairy heifers. J Dairy Sci. 83:2282-4.


Hobbies/Non-Academic Interests

One word: Flying. OK, OK, maybe there's more to me than just that. Another word: Beer. Too bad they don't mix. NOTE: To all employees of the Federal Aviation Administration: I always adhere to the eight hours bottle to throttle rule. Just ask anyone who knows me. I've had a Private Pilot license since March, 1987, but only accumulated 200 hours until a BIG EVENT June, 1995. I bought a Cessna 172, N80087, and in the first year of ownership, I flew over 100 hours! Life is grand! Admittedly, I haven't continued to burn avgas at that rate (aircraft ownership ain't cheap!), but I get out when I can. N80087 is based at Windham (IJD), and from there I've flown around Southern New England quite a bit, a few forays into Northern New England and some into eastern PA. Actually, maybe flying and beer do mix in a way, because some of my flying trips are actually to pick up some beer from various microbreweries scattered about the NE. If you can get to Middlebury, VT, swing by Otter Creek Brewing and treat yourself to the Copper Ale. Others I recommend are Ginty McDuff's in Portland, ME, Seadog in Camden, ME, Shipyard Brewing in Kennebunkport, ME, and City Steam in Hartford, CT. Actually, I've never been to a microbrewery that didn't have at least one good brew...most of 'em have several ales I like.


Favorite Links

Surprise, Surprise...These links mirror my hobbies and interests!

  • First, we've got flying-related stuff...
  • Of course, ya can't go flying without checking the weather...
  • And since we're off flying in search of the elusive beer...
    • Find a brewpub near you!
    • Or maybe even try it at home
  • But what about fun stuff in cyberspace? Try the following...
    • Get the inside scoop on real-life American workplaces as faithfully recorded by Dilbert
    • You think you know what time it is? Better check...

Last updated: 08/15/2016 11:48:24

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University of Connecticut
Department of Animal Science
3636 Horsebarn Road Ext.
Storrs, CT 06269-4040
Phone: (860) 486-2413
Fax: (860) 486-4375